Reformation 500 – Symposium Part I

Friday 17 February, 5pm:

The first part of the Theological Symposium is headlined by “It is for freedom that Christ has set us free”. The picture shows the three Professors: Kajsa Ahlstrand, Volker Leppin and for Gunda Werner spoke Maureen Junker-Kenny. Chair: Prof. Graeme Murdock.

kleinsymposium1diskussion

Volker Leppin (Tübingen, Germany) explores under the title “Mysticism, the Reformation and the Freedom of a Christian the relationship between Luther’s theology and the earlier scriptures of Johann Tauler. It is exciting to see that Martin Luther and Ignatius from Loyola shared same texts, same tradition, but then they went on different paths. – Gunda Werner (Tübingen, read by Maureen Junker-Kenny) explores the words “Love, Freedom and guilt” in the wider horizon of the debate in Luther’s time, including the famous scripture about the free will from Erasmus from Rotterdam. Still nowadays it is the question, how much of our decisions are done by our own will. – Kajsa Ahlstrand (Uppsala) speaks under the headline “It is not all about freedom” about Lutheranism in Sweden and we learn, how intolerant Lutheranism as a State Religion was! The saying “I have a little Luther in my shoulder” reminds us that even in families there were examinations to make sure everybody is following the Catechism of Luther. The doctrine of the two kingdoms led into obedience. Through Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s life and Theology the Lutherans learned: the obedience is to God, not to human political structures. There can be a “status confessionis” where we are asked following the Gospel and not political leaders if we see us as true disciples of Jesus Christ. Today we see: Lutheran Theology can lead into resisting political power.

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